Commercial Pest Hot Spots

Click on the hot spots for more information.

Commercial Pest Hot Spots

Restrooms

Facility restrooms are attractive to many pests due to the high amount of moisture present. Repair leaking faucets as soon as possible and insure regular, timely maintenance is performed.

Roaches hide in cracks and crevices around sinks and mirrors and in wall voids around plumbing. Silicone caulking can be used to seal up many harborage areas.

Floor drains are sometimes the source for drain fly or phorid fly infestations. Regular cleaning using a drain brush will help remove the organic matter in which these flies will breed.

Odor control is another common issue with restroom areas. Installation of a timed odor controlling misting unit can yield an easy solution.

Flies are often attracted to restroom areas and can be easily treated through the use of ultraviolet fly attracting lights which offer an often unnoticed method of fly control.

Kitchen

Commercial kitchens offer some of the most challenging pest control situations in our industry. The combination of food, heat, moisture, and many places to hide is the ideal situation for pests to breed. Look for roaches in dark, moist areas, or squeezed into tight cracks and crevices. Inspect deliveries as they arrive, especially ones coming in cardboard containers or on wooden pallets.

Rotate your stored food products such as flour, grain and pasta using the First In – First Out method. Cleanup spilled product immediately and try to keep bulk products in sealable bins or containers.

Rodents can enter a building in many ways. Make sure door thresholds are no higher that 1/4 inch and all holes to the outside are sealed, especially around plumbing and electrical ingress. Trim trees back so they are not touching the building.

Small flies, such as fruit flies and drain flies can breed in drains and other areas where organic debris builds up. Sanitation to get rid of these breeding areas will usually get rid of the problem.

DUMPSTER

Proper and ongoing management is essential in this pest haven. A few simple steps can help to prevent many pest and rodent issues.

Cover open trash cans with a lid and be sure to use a plastic bag inside each can. Not only with these steps reduce odors, but will also keep flies away.

Keep areas around the dumpsters as sanitary as possible. Your dumpster should be large enough to storage all garbage so that none collects on the floor around the dumpster. The dumpster should be kept on a washable surface and not on dirt or grass.

STORAGE

Moisture is a pests best friend – which makes storage areas ideal places to find whatever’s bugging you. You can help eliminate pests by getting rid of sources of moisture, like materials that may contain water or cracks that may leak residual water.

Check for spider webs behind rarely used items and in out of the way corners, etc. By regularly removing any webs you find, you can prevent breeding from occurring. Also, by keeping small insects out of your storage areas, you’re eliminating a food source for spiders.

Paper and cardboard are common areas where cockroaches and silverfish like to hide and breed. These 2 pests often like to supplement their diet with the cellulose from paper and cardboard products.

OFFICE

Exclusion is the main concern here. Keep pests out of your office to ensure a sanitary and nuisance free work environment.

Ensuring that the main pest prone areas are properly maintained while keeping a pest free barrier around this area are keys to staying pest free.

Spiders, ants and earwigs are often attracted to your plants and flowers. Be very careful to inspect any cut flowers or foliage before bringing inside your office from outside. Pests love to hitchhike their way into your office this way.

Also, be sure to install a weather strip along the bottom of all doors so that mice and rats can’t squeeze in. It’s hard to believe, but some of these rodents are able to enter An office through a hole as small as a pencil can fit through.

LOBBY

Check for spider webs behind bookcases and in out of the way corners, etc. By regularly removing any webs you find, you can prevent breeding from occurring. Also, by keeping small insects out of your lobby, you’re eliminating a food source for spiders.

Also, be sure to install a weather strip along the bottom of all doors so that mice and rats can’t squeeze in. It’s hard to believe, but some of these rodents are able to enter a lobby through a hole as small as a pencil can fit through.

DINNING AREA

A restaurant or cafeteria’s face to the public is its dining area. Pests in this area can affect your reputation and warrant regulatory attention. Pests can be carried or migrate from the kitchen, or come in through open doors and gaps in the structure.

It is a good practice to vacuum booths regularly to remove food debris. This not only will help remove the food source for roaches and ants, but will allow for inspection of the void beneath the seats for signs of rodent activity.

Flies can be a major problem in dining areas. Not only are they a nuisance to your customers, but they also pose a health threat. Different flies breed in different mediums, so a proper identification of the fly will be the first step to find the source of the problem.

OUTDOORS

Wasps and bees like to build their nests within voids and protected sites such as under eves, electrical outlet boxes and even hose reels. Be especially careful opening these sorts of spaces after months of non-use.

Cockroaches, ants, spiders and other pests live and breed in landscaping mulch, leaf litter and any moist vegetation. Be sure your mulch is less than two inches thick and at least 12 inches away from your building’s foundation.

Flying insects are naturally drawn to your porch lights or any outdoor lighting. The use of yellow “bug” type of lighting in exterior fixtures can reduce the number of flying insects around your building at night.

Be sure to check around your building’s gutter downspouts for termites. These very destructive pests thrive in the moisture often found around downspouts. Direct water away from your building’s foundation and walls by making sure downspouts empty out away from the building.